A tipple for advertising gurus the world over

There’s a great website I follow called Gojee; I subscribe to their newsletter which has a weekly round-up of all that’s hot and tasty on the interwebs. One feature I especially look forward to is called WWDDD? As in: what would Don Draper drink? A question on the forefront of minds across the globe no doubt.


The Fella and I are huge Mad Men fans, massive. Ever since the show started in 2007 we’ve been totally hooked. You see, The Fella is an advertising creative, and a very clever one at that; so he enjoys it for much more than just the great storylines and the super-awesome-fabulous styling. Hence when the fifth season finished up last week, we found ourselves at a bit of a loss on our usual Mad Men night. Then I’d a brain wave and made us some deliciously-retro whisky sours. They were just the ticket to get the creative juices flowing and I feel sure Don would have approved.

While I got the inspiration for this cocktail from Gojee, I actually used a recipe given to me by a friend of The Fella. She insisted that a good whisky sour absolutely HAS to have egg white in it. Initially I wasn’t convinced. But she argued and persisted and basically wore me down and I’m so glad she did. Not only does putting egg white in your cocktail make you feel like Rocky or some other super-fit-healthy dude (thus totally negating the alcohol content); it also give the cocktail a beautiful frothy head and a je ne sais quoi that is hard to describe, especially after a few.

These are delicious, and the more of them you drink the more your boyfriend will start to look like Mr Draper, which is never a bad thing, is it?!

Whisky Sours

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Tonight I’ll mostly be eating purple food

I’m from outside a large town in the north east of Ireland, a town with a pretty distinctive accent.

Even when I meet Irish people here in Australia, and tell them where I’m from, their usual response is: ‘well ya don’t sound like you’re from Drogheda!’. I think it may have been voted the worst accent in Ireland at some stage. But I love it, especially some specific words, you see, people in Drogheda don’t say the word purple, the say ‘puawpul’.

Anything this colour has to be good for you, right?

Last week I was sick, all week. It was horrible, at one stage I was pretty sure I was going to die. I think it may have been the man-flu, it really wasn’t fun. I finally started to feel better on Sunday and decided I needed some warm, vitamin-filled, wholesome food. So I made a big batch of puawpul borscht, yummo!

Even just prepping the veg for this soup cheered me up, the colours were fantastic. Just for giggles I made sure everything that went into it was a shade of purple: the beetroot (obviously), the onions, the cabbage, the potatoes (well the skin at least), even the carrots! What can I say, when you haven’t left the house for four consecutive days, you start to find the colour of vegetables amusing. As the vegetables cooked, the colour changed into the most wonderful deep red, it just looked fantastic, but probably not food to eat on a first date or while wearing your Sunday best. And the colour is pervasive; eat enough of this soup and your wee may just turn a jaunty shade of pink!

Colourful urine aside, this soup is delicious. It’s hearty and filling; sweet, peppery and rich. It goes really well with a dollop of sour cream and a slice of sourdough. And it just has to be packed full of vitamins and good for you things, which is always excellent.

The two photos of Drogheda were taken my by very talented Papa, check out more of his work here and here.

Puawpul borscht

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Passionfruit and lemon curd

Edible gifts are the best. End of story.

The Fella took this picture in our Dublin apartment in early December 2008. I was pretty intent on making, oh about 10 bazillion litres of jam and so didn’t notice when he crept up behind me. That was the year the Irish recession was just starting to take hold, and boy did it take us all by surprise.

For most of the preceding Christmases, I ran up huge credit card bills buying unnecessary presents for both of our families. Not that the gifts were unnecessary, I like giving people gifts, but I think we’d kind of lost the true spirit of it. I know I’m at risk of sounding like cheesy American film, but bear with me here. We bought things just for the sake of giving them, without really thinking if the recipient would need, or even like the gift.  We were also buying for so many people; getting ‘something small’ for The Fella’s-cousin’s-ex-boyfriend’s-neighbour-because-they-sat-beside-us-in-the-pub-one-night suddenly became perfectly reasonable. Celtic-tiger Ireland was certainly a place to behold.

Then in 2008 I had what the Australians call a ‘dummy spit’. I had been working in a high-pressure sales job and was watching the market contract before my very eyes. But also on a personal level, I’d just had enough of the excess, the waste, and most of all, the pressure. So I went on-line and ordered two cases of jam jars; and that was my Christmas shopping done. It took all of 10 minutes.

I ended up making a trio of preserves: chili and tomato relish, rhubarb and ginger jam and lemon and orange marmalade. I packaged them all together in cute little bags and gave them as gifts to friends and family alike. I wish I had a picture of them, but this was long before I had ever even thought of blogging.

They were the most successful presents I ever gave. Small, thoughtful, delicious; but most of all: useful.

Since then, I’ve never reverted back to the mass-consumer gift giving. The Fella and I have pared back our list and our spending. Of course, we don’t make everything we give, but we do try to put in a little more thought into what we give and to whom. And this year everyone we love will be getting a jar of this delicious curd on various special occasions.

I made this a few weeks ago with the last of the autumn passion fruit, and oh my god was it delicious. It lasted all of two days in our fridge, and that was with us trying to be self-controlled! It’s like lemon curd but it gets an extra little bit of tang from the passionfruit, also the seeds give it a lovely bit of texture. It could go on absolutely anything from pie-crust to scones to ice-cream or meringue.  And best of all you can personalise your labels or jars and turn it into the perfect (and dare I say it: pretty darned impressive) gift for any occasion.

Passionfruit curd

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